Every day, organizations worldwide are engaged in a collective two steps forward, one step back march toward improved immigration services and policies. What hard-earned lessons are these nonprofits, and the foundations that support them, learning from their persistent efforts? This collection of evaluations, case studies, and lessons learned exposes and explores the nuances of effective collaboration, the value of coordinated messaging, the bedrock of ongoing advocacy efforts, and the vital importance of long-term and flexible funding.

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TRAC Immigration

October 15, 2021

TRAC's Immigration Project is a unique new multi-year effort to systematically go after very detailed information from the government, check it for accuracy and completeness and then make it available in an understandable way to the American people, Congress, immigration groups and others.Currently available on TRAC's Immigration site are reports focusing on Border Patrol apprehensions along the border, Border Patrol staffing, criminal enforcement in the federal district courts and government inspections activities at the designated ports of entry. Additional reports and studies are under development on a range of subjects such as the granting of immigration benefits — green cards, naturalization, affirmative asylum, etc — and the workings of the immigration courts. These reports and the latest data obtained from the government will be posted to our new site as the information is obtained from the various agencies, checked for accuracy and completeness and analyzed.

Immigration After Trump: What Would Immigration Policy that Followed American Public Opinion Look Like?

January 20, 2021

The last four years of U.S. immigration policy have been driven by the Trump administration's aggressive stance against all types of immigration, legal and illegal. President Joe Biden has promised to reverse many restrictive immigration policies from the Trump era by reforming the asylum system, raising the cap on refugee admissions, revoking the travel ban on immigrants from several Muslim-majority countries, halting the construction of a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico, suspending all deportations for the first 100 days of his presidency, making the DACA program permanent, and sending a comprehensive immigration reform bill to Congress. The Republican and Democratic parties offer starkly different perspectives on immigration-related issues. But what would an immigration policy that followed American public opinion look like? This report outlines responses to a survey of public opinion on topics such as DACA, the border wall, refugees, and more.

The Economic Value of Citizenship for Immigrants in the United States

September 1, 2012

Beyond imparting political and social rights, naturalization appears to confer economic gains for immigrants in the United States, with a wage premium of at least 5 percent even after accounting for the fact that naturalized immigrants have higher levels of education, better language skills, and more work experience in the United States than noncitizens. More than 8 million legal immigrants in the United States are eligible to apply for citizenship but have not done so. Naturalization rates in the United States are lower than most other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, the report notes.

Four Freedoms Fund: A Pioneering Foundation Partnership Advocates for Immigrants

January 3, 2008

Reviews the development and achievements of a collaborative to leverage funding, share ideas and lessons learned, and forge strategies for engaging immigrants and refugees in civic life by supporting grassroots advocacy groups across twenty-eight states.

Advocacy; Refugees & Asylum Seekers