Every day, organizations worldwide are engaged in a collective two steps forward, one step back march toward improved immigration services and policies. What hard-earned lessons are these nonprofits, and the foundations that support them, learning from their persistent efforts? This collection of evaluations, case studies, and lessons learned exposes and explores the nuances of effective collaboration, the value of coordinated messaging, the bedrock of ongoing advocacy efforts, and the vital importance of long-term and flexible funding.

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A Ripple, Not a Wave: Comparing the Last Decade of Foundation Funding for Migrant Communities and Movements

October 27, 2022

Since NCRP's first report describing the state of foundation funding for immigrant and refugee groups, the world has grown more dangerous for people on the move.Although COVID-19 slowed migration for a short time, climate disasters and deteriorating social, political, and economic conditions around the world have led more people to seek homes in new places. In the United States, right-wing politicians have continued their decades-long tactic of treating immigrants and refugees as political pawns. Former President Donald Trump used migrants as an easy scapegoat for division, effectively zeroing the country's refugee resettlement goals throughout his presidential term. In 2021, Customs and Border Protection officers on horseback were caught on camera using whips to drive Haitian asylum seekers away. Several Republican governors sent buses or planes misleading migrants north in a craven political stunt. And after 10 years of instability, the Supreme Court looks poised to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program for good, meaning more than 600,000 people who have built their lives in the United States will become vulnerable to deportation. These attacks are unfair and harmful not only to people moving across borders, but to all of us.NCRP's new data shows that more funders participate in pro-immigrant and pro-refugee philanthropic spaces today than they did in the past. This is progress, but it's far from enough. NCRP also found that the pro-immigrant, pro-refugee movement's share of all foundation grants has shrunk 11% since DACA was first introduced, even as foundations themselves have grown richer. Too many foundations and major donors have ignored groups that are adept at advocating for their communities and holding political leaders accountable. Because of this, the migrant community – and our country – face more precarity today.In the last few years alone, pro-immigrant and pro-refugee groups have resettled refugees from Afghanistan and Ukraine, advocated for the specific needs of queer migrants, organized Black-led groups in a model of mutual aid, strengthened safeguards for our democracy and focused attention on urgent climate emergencies, all while sounding a constant message of welcome. Migrant organizations, especially movement advocacy groups, have done this in the face of an increasingly hostile political environment with extremely limited resources because funders have fallen short.Now more than ever, foundations must move with intention and urgency to center, support and follow the lead of the pro-immigrant and pro-refugee movement.This isn't just the right thing to do. It's also necessary if funders hope to meet their racial justice commitments, support dignity for all and reach groups with underappreciated solutions for each of their "issue" portfolios.NCRP hopes this tool, informed by the deep wisdom of so many community and philanthropic leaders, will help move the philanthropic sector toward justice.

Facing Crises with Resilience: HIAS 2021/2022 Impact Report

September 15, 2022

With more than 100 million forcibly displaced people around the world, an ongoing pandemic, and a war in Ukraine that has caused the largest displacement of people in Europe since World War II, our work at HIAS in recent times has been both extremely difficult and urgently vital.Thanks to committed partners like you, we were able to open our arms in welcome, helping more than 1 million displaced people realize their rights and rebuild their lives in safety and freedom.Read through our 2021/2022 Impact Report to learn more about the essential work your support made possible.

Building Trust with Immigrant and Refugee Families: Spreading and Adapting 2Gen Working Practices

April 22, 2022

Trust between social service organizations and their clients is crucial to effectively provide services to immigrant and refugee families. Our brief on building trust with these groups explores how we can form these relationships and sustain them long-term to best serve these vulnerable communities.

Community-Based Outreach & Activity

Building Forward Together: GCIR 2021 Annual Report

April 13, 2022

Founded in 1990, Grantmakers Concerned with Immigrants and Refugees (GCIR) is the nation's only immigrant-focused philanthropy-supporting organization (PSO). GCIR works with our 130 member institutions, the 1,200 individual grantmakers in our network, our partners in the field, and other PSOs to mobilize funder resources on the most pressing issues facing immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers.

Global Detroit 2020 – 2021 Impact Report

April 12, 2022

Global Detroit is a national leader advocating for and executing strategies to drive equitable local, regional and statewide economic growth through immigrant inclusion. We continue to develop and lead programs centered on global talent, entrepreneurship and neighborhoods with the aim of demonstrating their potential for large-scale impact. We also continue to conduct groundbreaking research, drive policy and serve as a leading advocate for immigrant inclusion as a strategy to build prosperity for everyone in Southeast Michigan.

Evaluation of the Immigrant Rights Portfolio Strategy (2015–2020): Summary Report

April 1, 2022

Since the late 1980s, many policymakers and members of the American public have viewed enforcement as the principal tool of the United States immigration system, either to deter migrants from coming to the country without papers or to punish immigrants who (intentionally or unintentionally) fail to comply with immigration law. As a result, hundreds of thousands of immigrants are arrested and placed in deportation proceedings, or otherwise removed from the U.S., with a disproportionate impact on Black immigrants.Before we launched our strategy in 2015, we listened closely to our grantees whose constituents were directly affected by detentions and deportations that persisted despite policymakers' avowed support for immigrants. Recognizing that immigrants' needs for family unity and an end to harsh enforcement were unlikely to be met through comprehensive immigration reform in Congress, the Immigrant Rights portfolio focused on supporting advocates working on enforcement reform and their goals. In making this commitment, Ford was the first major U.S. philanthropy to establish ending harsh enforcement as a principal focus of its immigrant rights strategy.Over a matter of five years, we invested nearly $118 million in organizations working to achieve changes in advocacy and policy, build the field, and shift the narrative around immigrants. This included approximately $43 million invested through our BUILD initiative and approximately $23 million distributed through our 2020 Social Justice Bond. We provided general support to organizations representing immigrants directly impacted by harsh enforcement, as well as to longstanding grantees who were using litigation, mobilization, advocacy, and communications as tactics that reinforced one another. Other funding helped the movement confront strategic gaps and challenges, draw on expert advice, bring organizations together for collaborative learning, and strengthen philanthropic partnerships.In the fall of 2020, we partnered with consultants Kathleen Sullivan and David Shorr to evaluate this strategy, deepen our learning, and make informed decisions on where to focus moving forward. The evaluation concluded in spring 2021.

Rian Immigrant Center 2021 Year in Review

March 15, 2022

At the time of print, Russia is waging war in Ukraine, and the humanitarian, refugee crises in Afghanistan, Syria, Somalia, Yemen, Haiti, Central America and elsewhere weigh heavy. The pandemic has resulted in deep loss and pain for so many – and disproportionally on marginalized immigrant families. It's a dark picture. In this context, we share a summary of the work of our immigration legal, education, resource and support services, advocacy, and international learning exchange teams. Our hearts are full of gratitude for your support - our donors, foundations, government and community partners. Thank you for standing in solidarity with our immigrant neighbors. We are grateful for our longstanding partnerships with Rosie's Place and the Boston Medical Center, and for being able to assist more immigrant patients at Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Healthcare for the Homeless (with Health Law Advocates), and assisting more K-12 immigrant students in Boston, Cambridge, Somerville (with Enroot), Revere, Chelsea, Everett, Malden, and Winthrop.

New York Immigration Coalition 2021 Annual Report

February 15, 2022

The New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC) is an umbrella policy & advocacy organization that represents over 200 immigrant and refugee rights groups throughout New York.The NYIC serves one of the largest and most diverse newcomer populations in the United States. The multi-racial and multi-sector NYIC membership base includes grassroots and nonprofit community organizations, religious and academic institutions, labor unions, as well as legal and socioeconomic justice organizations. The NYIC not only establishes a forum for immigrant groups to voice their concerns, but also provides a platform for collective action to drive positive social change.Since its founding in 1987, the NYIC has evolved into a powerful voice of advocacy by spearheading innovative policies, promoting and protecting the rights of immigrant communities, improving newcomer access to services, developing leadership and capacity, expanding civic participation, and mobilizing member groups to respond to the fluctuating needs of immigrant communities.

California Immigrant Policy Center 2021 Impact Report

January 27, 2022

The California Immigrant Policy Center (CIPC) is a constituent-based statewide immigrant rights organization with staff presence in Sacramento, the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, and the Central Valley. It is the premier immigrant rights institution in the state that promotes and protects safety, health and public benefits and integration programs for immigrants, and one of the few organizations that effectively combines legislative and policy advocacy, strategic communications, organizing and capacity building to pursue its mission. It is powered by a staff of policy experts and advocates; a Steering Committee composed of 13 statewide organizations; 85 member organizations; and nine regional coalition partners spanning Southern and Northern California, the Central Coast and the Central Valley. CIPC advocates for policies that uphold the humanity of immigrants and refugees while advancing racial, social and economic justice.

Four Freedoms Fund 2021 Year in Review

January 12, 2022

Four Freedoms Fund (FFF) strengthens the capacity of the immigrant justice movement to ensure all immigrants, regardless of immigration status, have dignity, power to shape change, and agency to determine the quality of their life, community, and future. To achieve this goal, FFF believes we need a robust and powerful infrastructure of organizations leading the transformation of our country's systems to be inclusive, fair and just, and grounded in racial, economic, and gender justice.

60 Years of Fighting for Justice: Annual Report 2021

December 13, 2021

Vera started in 1961 with Herb Sturz sitting alone in the alcove adjoining Louis Schweitzer's secretary's office. Today it has grown to 290 employees with offices in Brooklyn, Los Angeles, New Orleans, and Washington, DC.As we mourn our founder, and his successor Michael E. Smith (who died in May), we lean on the lessons they left us and work to build on their legacies.Herb's formula—using compelling data and tireless advocacy to transform unjust systems—continues to succeed. In our 60th year, we are applying that formula at the highest levels of power, as we focus intentionally on eradicating racial injustice. The criminal legal and immigration systems are fundamentally brutal, especially to people of color. Vera exists to transform these systems so that communities can thrive.On the pages that follow, read how Vera seeks to transform the role of the prosecutor to one that pursues justice, not jails; to make sure that every immigrant facing deportation has a government-funded lawyer and a fighting chance to stay with their family and in our communities; and ensure that every incarcerated student has the chance to receive a quality college education. Vera once incubated social justice organizations across New York City. Now we strive for national policy change across state capitals and in Washington, DC, alongside community partners and government leaders.Our founding charter stated that we exist "to seek and further the equal protection of the laws." We are now carrying this mission—and the legacy of our founders—forward at a larger scale, with 60 years of experience and our unwavering commitment to justice for all.

Resilience & Community: Supporting Immigrant Communities Through FFF’s COVID-19 Response Funding

December 13, 2021

In 2020, as communities around the world faced one of the most unprecedented global health and economic challenges of our lifetime, Four Freedoms Fund (FFF) launched a COVID-19 Response Fund and strategy to support immigrant justice organizations throughout and beyond the pandemic.This report details the impact of more than $2.5 million in rapid response funding that was dispersed through 56 grants to groups in 23 states.