Every day, organizations worldwide are engaged in a collective two steps forward, one step back march toward improved immigration services and policies. What hard-earned lessons are these nonprofits, and the foundations that support them, learning from their persistent efforts? This collection of evaluations, case studies, and lessons learned exposes and explores the nuances of effective collaboration, the value of coordinated messaging, the bedrock of ongoing advocacy efforts, and the vital importance of long-term and flexible funding.

Know of content that should be considered for this collection? Please suggest a report!

"Immigration" by is licensed under CC 2.0

Search this collection

Clear all

3 results found

reorder grid_view

Noncitizen Youth in the Juvenile Justice System: A guide to juvenile detention reform

June 2, 2014

This report—the seventh in a series focused on juvenile detention reform—boldly goes where few reports have gone before: straight to the intersection of immigration and the American juvenile justice system. Readers will learn how to help ensure the safe and fair treatment of noncitizen youth in detention by adopting policies and procedures that are consistent with the goals of the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI). 

Children in Immigrant Families

February 6, 2010

This report shares facts and statistics about children from immigrant families living in North Carolina. It aims to educate the public and engage policymakers in meaningful conversations about eliminating the barriers that these children and their families face.

Supporting English Language Acquisition: Opportunities for Foundations to Strengthen Immigrant Families

August 15, 2005

By investing strategically in English acquisition programs, foundations can make an important contribution to improve social and economic outcomes for working-poor immigrant families. To help funders gain a better understanding of the issues, this briefing paper provides an overview of characteristics of the LEP immigrant population in the United States and discusses the impact of limited English skills on newcomer families. It highlights proven and promising language acquisition programs and strategies that help improve immigrant families' social, educational, and economic well-being. Finally, the paper offers a set of recommendations for investing in effective language acquisition programs that can help immigrants maintain strong family relationships, improve their long-term economic security, and become full, participating members of our community.

Children; Field Building